VOTE: 2018 Leo's Coney Island High School Game of the Week, week 2 (Poll Closed)

  • West BLoomfield at Clarkston
    9%
    367 votes

     
  • Monroe Jefferson at New Boston Huron
    19%
    749 votes

     
  • Anchor Bay at Port Huron
    27%
    1,053 votes

     
  • Crestwood at Redford Thurston
    31%
    1,227 votes

     
  • Southfield A&T at Rochester
    14%
    538 votes

     

Create your own.

Opinions! We all have them. Find out what people really think with polls and surveys from Crowdsignal.com

81 Comments

  • Milesnjenn - 2 years ago

    Go Crestwood!

  • Barack Obama - 2 years ago

    Crestwood sucks balls let’s take this dub thurston 50-0 and crestwood is gay and New Boston Huron sucks ass they can’t even score

  • Brian - 2 years ago

    Im going d4 wish me luck #first quarterback to go 0-9
    #fuckmepapi????????

  • Llllll - 2 years ago

    your writing. The function and features of a paragraph are explained, together with guidelines for using paragraphs to create a clear and coherent written structure.

    Other useful guides: Using the comma, Sentence structure.

    What is a paragraph?

    Writing of any length requires subdivision into a number of points or stages, and these stages are expressed in a paragraph. Paragraphs, whether denoted by a new line and an indentation or a line break, provide a structure for your writing. The end of a paragraph represents a significant pause in the flow of the writing. This pause is a signpost to the reader, indicating that the writing is about to move on to a different stage. Each paragraph should deal with one idea or aspect of an idea, and it should be clear to the reader what this main idea is.

    How long should a paragraph be?

    There is no absolute rule: very short or long paragraphs can work when used by an experienced writer. However, as a guideline, paragraphs should usually be no less that 2 or 3 sentences long and there should be 2 or 3 paragraphs per page of A4. The length of a paragraph depends on the idea being treated, but if a paragraph is shorter than 2 or 3 sentences, check to see if it is not really part of the previous or next paragraph. If your paragraph is longer than half a page, check to see if the idea would be better explained in two or more paragraphs.

    When do I start a new paragraph?

    Start a new paragraph for each new point or stage in your writing. When you begin a paragraph you should always be aware of the main idea being expressed in that paragraph. Be alert to digressions or details that belong either in a different paragraph or need a paragraph of their own.

    How do I write a paragraph?

    A paragraph can have an internal structure with an introduction, main body and conclusion in the same way as an essay The example below shows a paragraph which:

    introduces the paragraph's main point;
    develops and supports the point;
    shows the significance of the point made.
    paragraph_paras.gif

    The previous example showed one style of paragraph. It is a useful rule always to have three stages in a paragraph: introduction, development and conclusion.

    The introduction

    The introduction makes the purpose of the paragraph clear so the reader can read the paragraph with this purpose in mind. It is usually necessary to show the place the paragraph has in the structure of the piece as a whole. This can be done with just a word (Nevertheless, However, Furthermore) or it may need a phrase (Another point to consider is....). In an essay, this might mean showing how the main idea of the paragraph answers the essay question. In some cases when the paragraph begins a new section, it may be necessary to write a separate paragraph which explains how the following section relates to the piece as a whole.

    The development

    The body of the paragraph should develop the idea that has been introduced at the beginning of the paragraph. This can be done by:

    redefining the idea;
    giving examples;
    commenting on evidence;
    showing implications or consequences;
    examining opposing ideas.
    The conclusion

    The end of the paragraph can show the significance of the point, link back to the beginning of the paragraph, comment on the implications of the point as a whole, or make a link to the next paragraph. It is important not to end the paragraph with a digression or irrelevant detail. Each sentence in the paragraph should be part of the internal structure.

    Another example of a paragraph using this three part structure is given below.

    paragraph_essays.gif

    Summary

    Paragraphs provide a structure for your writing which enables the reader to identify and follow the developing stages in your treatment of the material. Remember that paragraphs should have their own internal structure whilst fitting into the larger structure of the whole piece of writing. Be clear what the main idea for each paragraph

  • Yyyu - 2 years ago

    and process your ideas into meaningful units of thought.

    What do paragraphs do?
    Imagine reading this page without paragraph breaks. Paragraphs create order and logic by helping your reader recognize the boundaries where one point ends and another begins.

    How long should a paragraph be?
    In a first draft, it may make sense to set a goal for length. For example, you can set a goal of writing four to six sentences per paragraph: in that number of sentences you can announce an idea, prove that idea with evidence, and explain why this evidence matters by linking it to the overall goal of your paper.

    In the final version of your paper you may have a shorter paragraph or two. Short paragraphs call a lot of attention to themselves, so they can effectively emphasize a point. Too many short paragraphs, however, may indicate that your ideas are not developed with evidence and analysis.

    You'll generally read and write longer paragraphs in academic papers. However, too many long paragraphs can provide readers with too much information to manage at one time. Readers need planned pauses or breaks when reading long complex papers in order to understand your presented ideas. Remember this writing mantra: "Give your readers a break!" or "Good paragraphs give one pause!"

    Kinds of sentences in a paragraph
    Thinking about paragraphs rigidly in terms of length may lead to formulaic writing. Instead, as you revise your draft think about how each sentence is functioning in your paragraph, and whether your paragraph has sufficient functional sentences to make its point.

    Transition sentences guide your reader smoothly from the topic of the preceding paragraph into the topic of your new paragraph. Writers sometimes begin with a transition sentence before introducing the topic of the new paragraph.

    A topic sentence states the main idea of a paragraph. Beginning a paragraph with a topic sentence ensures your reader recognizes early in the paragraph what larger idea the paragraph is going to demonstrate. Expert writers may not introduce the topic until the middle or end of the paragraph, and often imply their topics without ever writing a topic sentence.

    Body sentences develop the topic of the paragraph. These sentences work to analyze data or quotations, describe a text or event, set up a comparison, showcase evidence, and sometimes they enumerate the logical points for readers to give them a sense of a paper's bigger picture. In body sentences, you need to consider how much quoted data or evidence will demonstrate or prove your point.

    Linking sentences relate back to the paper's main argument by showing how the idea of that paragraph matches the overall goal of the paper.

    Concluding sentences may bring a section to its end before you move on to a new section of the paper.

    Some sample paragraphs
    Undergraduate art analysis
    Notice how the writer develops the idea in the body sentences, as promised in the first sentence, and concludes her paragraph by offering a keen, close observation of specific details.

    In order to understand how Manet's work echoes or communicates with Titian's, one must first consider the similarities between their paintings. To begin with, both take a nude woman as the subject. More than that, however, Manet directly copies the composition of Titian's Venus; the overwhelming similarity in color and the figures' arrangement in each painting prove this. Both women are lying in the same position with their heads on the left-hand side of the canvas. Both women have their left leg crossed over the right. Both women have flowers and accessories. Other key elements unite these paintings, as well: the arrangement of the sheets on the bed; the green curtains; the servants; and the small animal at the foot of the bed. All these features clearly indicate that Manet echoes Titian. If one stopped at the similarity in the composition, it would appear that both paintings communicate the same thing; both would be

  • Mmmmm - 2 years ago

    This handout will help you understand how paragraphs are formed, how to develop stronger paragraphs, and how to completely and clearly express your ideas.

    What is a paragraph?

    Paragraphs are the building blocks of papers. Many students define paragraphs in terms of length: a paragraph is a group of at least five sentences, a paragraph is half a page long, etc. In reality, though, the unity and coherence of ideas among sentences is what constitutes a paragraph. A paragraph is defined as “a group of sentences or a single sentence that forms a unit” (Lunsford and Connors 116). Length and appearance do not determine whether a section in a paper is a paragraph. For instance, in some styles of writing, particularly journalistic styles, a paragraph can be just one sentence long. Ultimately, a paragraph is a sentence or group of sentences that support one main idea. In this handout, we will refer to this as the “controlling idea,” because it controls what happens in the rest of the paragraph.

    How do I decide what to put in a paragraph?

    Before you can begin to determine what the composition of a particular paragraph will be, you must first decide on an argument and a working thesis statement for your paper. What is the most important idea that you are trying to convey to your reader? The information in each paragraph must be related to that idea. In other words, your paragraphs should remind your reader that there is a recurrent relationship between your thesis and the information in each paragraph. A working thesis functions like a seed from which your paper, and your ideas, will grow. The whole process is an organic one—a natural progression from a seed to a full-blown paper where there are direct, familial relationships between all of the ideas in the paper.

    The decision about what to put into your paragraphs begins with the germination of a seed of ideas; this “germination process” is better known as brainstorming. There are many techniques for brainstorming; whichever one you choose, this stage of paragraph development cannot be skipped. Building paragraphs can be like building a skyscraper: there must be a well-planned foundation that supports what you are building. Any cracks, inconsistencies, or other corruptions of the foundation can cause your whole paper to crumble.

    So, let’s suppose that you have done some brainstorming to develop your thesis. What else should you keep in mind as you begin to create paragraphs? Every paragraph in a paper should be:

    Unified: All of the sentences in a single paragraph should be related to a single controlling idea (often expressed in the topic sentence of the paragraph).
    Clearly related to the thesis: The sentences should all refer to the central idea, or thesis, of the paper (Rosen and Behrens 119).
    Coherent: The sentences should be arranged in a logical manner and should follow a definite plan for development (Rosen and Behrens 119).
    Well-developed: Every idea discussed in the paragraph should be adequately explained and supported through evidence and details that work together to explain the paragraph’s controlling idea (Rosen and Behrens 119).
    How do I organize a paragraph?

    There are many different ways to organize a paragraph. The organization you choose will depend on the controlling idea of the paragraph. Below are a few possibilities for organization, with links to brief examples:

    Narration: Tell a story. Go chronologically, from start to finish. (See an example.)
    Description: Provide specific details about what something looks, smells, tastes, sounds, or feels like. Organize spatially, in order of appearance, or by topic. (See an example.)
    Process: Explain how something works, step by step. Perhaps follow a sequence—first, second, third. (See an example.)
    Classification: Separate into groups or explain the various parts of a topic. (See an example.)
    Illustration: Give examples and explain how those examples prove your point. (See the detailed exampl

  • Hddhhd - 2 years ago

    week ago a friend invited a couple of other couples over for dinner. Eventually, the food (but not the wine) was cleared off the table for what turned out to be some fierce Scrabbling. Heeding the strategy of going for the shorter, more valuable word over the longer cheaper word, our final play was “Bon,” which–as luck would have it!–happens to be a Japanese Buddhist festival, and not, as I had originally asserted while laying the tiles on the board, one half of a chocolate-covered cherry treat. Anyway, the strategy worked. My team only lost by 53 points instead of 58.

    Just the day before, our host had written of the challenges of writing short. In journalism–my friend’s chosen trade, and mostly my own, too–Mark Twain’s observation undoubtedly applies: “I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” The principle holds across genres, in letters, reporting, and other writing. It’s harder to be concise than to blather. (Full disclosure, this blog post will clock in at a blather-esque 803 words.) Good writing is boiled down, not baked full of air like a souffl??. No matter how yummy souffl??s may be. Which they are. Yummy like a Grisham novel.

    Lately, I’ve been noticing how my sentences have a tendency to keep going when I write them onscreen. This goes for concentrated writing as well as correspondence. (Twain probably believed that correspondence, in an ideal world, also demands concentration. But he never used email.) Last week I caught myself packing four conjunctions into a three-line sentence in an email. That’s inexcusable. Since then, I have tried to eschew conjunctions whenever possible. Gone are the commas, the and’s, but’s, and so’s; in are staccato declaratives. Better to read like bad Hemingway than bad Faulkner.

    Length–as we all know, and for lack of a more original or effective way of saying it–matters. But (ahem), it’s also a matter of how you use it. Style and length are technically two different things.

    Try putting some prose onscreen, though, and they mix themselves up pretty quickly. This has much to do with the time constraints we claim to feel in the digital age. We don’t have time to compose letters and post them anymore–much less pay postage, what with all the banks kinda-sorta losing our money these days–so we blast a few emails. We don’t have time to talk, so we text. We don’t have time to text to specific people, so we update our Facebook status. We don’t have time to write essays, so we blog.

    I’m less interested by the superficial reduction of words–i.e. the always charming imho or c u l8r–than the genres in which those communications occur: blogs, texts, tweets, emails. All these interstitial communiques, do they really reflect super brevity that would make Twain proud? Or do they just reflect poorly stylized writing that desperately seeks a clearer form?

    I rather think the latter. Clive Thompson wrote last month in the NYT Magazine that constant digital updates, after a day, can begin “to feel like a short story; follow it for a month, and it’s a novel.” He was right to see the bits as part of a larger whole. The words now flying through our digital pipes & ether more or less tend to resemble parts of bigger units, perhaps even familiar genres. But stories and novels have definite conclusions; they also have conventional lengths. Quick, how long is the conventional blog, when you add up all of its posts and comments? How long is the longest email thread you send back and forth on a single topic?

    Most important: What exactly are we writing when we’re doing all of this writing? I won’t pretend to coin a whole new term here; I still think the best we can muster is a more fitting analogue. And if we must find an analogue in an existing literary unit, I propose the paragraph. Our constant writing has begun to feel like a neverending digital paragraph. Not a tight, stabbing paragraph from The Sun Also Rises or even a graceful, sometimes-slinking, sometimes-

  • Ddd - 2 years ago

    There is no set length for a paragraph. It is possible, however, to have your paragraphs too long or too short. There are some guiding principles that will help you to get your paragraphs right.

    The entire paragraph should concern itself with a single focus. If it begins with a one focus or major point of discussion, it should not end with another or wander within different ideas. This is one reason why paragraphs can become over-long. More will be said later about maintaining focus in your writing.

    A paragraph should usually begin with an introductory sentence, which sets out the subject of that paragraph. The remainder of the paragraph should go on to explain and 'unpack' that initial sentence. If you find that you are writing about something different from your initial sentence, your paragraph is probably too long and your focus has wandered.

    If you find that your paragraphs are too long:

    Consider splitting a single long paragraph into two shorter ones. It is perfectly acceptable to begin a paragraph with a sentence connecting it to the previous paragraph.

    Try to organise your writing so that your ideas are developed logically and sequentially. If you find that a paragraph contains more than one idea, you may need to reorganise your essay so that your ideas are developed more logically.

    Look at the other paragraphs in your essay. Paragraphs should all be of roughly similar length. If you find that you have one or two paragraphs that are much longer than all the others, read them carefully and try to find out why.

    If a paragraph is too short, it may be because the initial idea has not been developed sufficiently. To some extent, the level of development is dependent on the writer's purpose and the overall length of the essay. However, you should beware of paragraphs of only two or three sentences. Read them carefully and consider if your idea has been sufficiently developed.

  • Ahaaa - 2 years ago

    More Speaking Resources
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    TOEIC | Business English | Chapter IV. The Paragraph V. The Long SentencePrevious Up Next

    Chapter IV. The Paragraph V. The Long Sentence
    § 16. De Quincey, the essayist, once said that the German sentence is like a carryall - always room for one more. That used to be true of the English sentence. Originally, to be sure, our sentence was short, but under the influence of Latin studies it grew heavy and unwieldy. From sixteenth century writers it is possible to quote sentences of five or six hundred words. Such a sentence would fill two pages of this book.
    When newspapers came to the front, the English sentence began to drop a part of its words. Yet one of the best journalists of the eighteenth century, Daniel Defoe, who wrote Robinson Crusoe, is not above writing an occasional sentence of great length. Here is a business sentence from Defoe:
    One office for lone of money for customs of goods, which by a plain method might be so ordered that the merchant might with ease pay the highest customs down, and so, by allowing the bank four per cent advance, be first to secure the £10 per cent which the king allows for prompt payment at the custom house, and be also freed from the troublesome work of finding bondsmen and securities for the money - which has exposed many a man to the tyranny of extents, either for himself or his friend, to his utter ruin, who under a more moderate prosecution had been able to pay all his debts, and by this method has been torn to pieces and disabled from making any tolerable proposal to his creditors.
    Here are a hundred and twenty-nine words in one sentence. The book from which it is taken, "An Essay upon Projects," averages more than sixty words to the sentence. How long is the average sentence today! It depends on the man, but in even the most literary prose it will not average more than thirty words. The average sentence of Macaulay's England is 23.43. Emerson's average sentence is less than that.
    But do business men never write long sentences! Alas! many are only too prone to this form of amusement. Amusement it is, for there is a curious pleasure in seeing how many words may be packed into one package. In Dean van Benthuy-sen's excellent brochure on English in Commercial Correspond* ence - published by the LaSalle Extension University - the following is quoted:
    I am in receipt of your letter of the 9th instant, relating in part to the stenographer and type-writer examinations next spring and also the question of local appointments in connection with the conducting of Civil Service examinations, concerning the latter of which I would say that with the exception of the route examinations which are conducted by the various district secretaries, the examinations are held by employees of the post offices at the different places of examination, who have been specially designated for such purpose under a provision of the Civil Service rules.
    The youth who got that must have felt as if he were perusing a railroad time-table. Good mental exercise! Never, never use that argument. To cause your reader or correspondent unnecessary mental labor is the greatest of all blunders in business English. The more patience he spends in getting at your thought, the less he will have for your proposition. Let us turn that alleged sentence into a paragraph. There are several versions that might be made. Here is one. [Note that while the indention, or blank space at the beginning of the first line, is a mere trifle in the printed line, it should be at least an inch deep in written manuscript.] -
    I have your inquiry of June ninth. You ask first about the stenographer and type-writer examinations next spring. [Here let him answer that inquiry.] You inquire also as to local appointments in connection with the conducting of Civil Service examinations. The route examinations are conducted by the various district se

  • Kkkkk - 2 years ago

    ceipt of your letter of the 9th instant, relating in part to the stenographer and type-writer examinations next spring and also the question of local appointments in connection with the conducting of Civil Service examinations, concerning the latter of which I would say that with the exception of the route examinations which are conducted by the various district secretaries, the examinations are held by employees of the post offices at the different places of examination, who have been specially designated for such purpose under a provision of the Civil Service rules.
    The youth who got that must have felt as if he were perusing a railroad time-table. Good mental exercise! Never, never use that argument. To cause your reader or correspondent unnecessary mental labor is the greatest of all blunders in business English. The more patience he spends in getting at your thought, the less he will have for your proposition. Let us turn that alleged sentence into a paragraph. There are several versions that might be made. Here is one. [Note that while the indention, or blank space at the beginning of the first line, is a mere trifle in the printed line, it should be at least an inch deep in written manuscript.] -
    I have your inquiry of June ninth. You ask first about the stenographer and type-writer examinations next spring. [Here let him answer that inquiry.] You inquire also as to local appointments in connection with the conducting of Civil Service examinations. The route examinations are conducted by the various district secretaries. The others are held at the different places of examination by post-office employees who have been specially designated for such purpose under the Civil Service rules.
    The single sentence has ninety-four words; the corresponding paragraph has only seventy, although it contains five sentences. Yet if the pa

  • Hdhdh - 2 years ago

    When you feel strongly about someone, so strongly that you love them, sometimes it doesn’t always make sense in a way that’s easy to articulate. You may really care about someone, but putting those thoughts into words is hard. Love is an exciting, confusing, up and down and everything in between sort of emotion. That’s why telling someone you love them is about more than three little words, it’s about explaining how and why you feel the way you do. That’s why love paragraphs can be a great way to tell the woman you’re with how much you care about her.

    So often people don’t take the time to tell someone how they feel. We send text messages, like photos, or kiss a cheek on our way out the door and even though we love someone we may not always take the time to write it down and tell them just how important they are. These love paragraphs for her do just that. They’re examples of I love you paragraphs that you can send to someone you care about—you can write them in a card, in a text message or email, in a letter you leave on a pillow, or something you memorize and say out loud. Taking the time to write out an I love you paragraph, will show your girlfriend or wife just how much she means to you.

    Here are over 50 love paragraphs for her to inspire your own I love you paragraphs:

  • Yee - 2 years ago

    De Quincey, the essayist, once said that the German sentence is like a carryall - always room for one more. That used to be true of the English sentence. Originally, to be sure, our sentence was short, but under the influence of Latin studies it grew heavy and unwieldy. From sixteenth century writers it is possible to quote sentences of five or six hundred words. Such a sentence would fill two pages of this book.
    When newspapers came to the front, the English sentence began to drop a part of its words. Yet one of the best journalists of the eighteenth century, Daniel Defoe, who wrote Robinson Crusoe, is not above writing an occasional sentence of great length. Here is a business sentence from Defoe:
    One office for lone of money for customs of goods, which by a plain method might be so ordered that the merchant might with ease pay the highest customs down, and so, by allowing the bank four per cent advance, be first to secure the £10 per cent which the king allows for prompt payment at the custom house, and be also freed from the troublesome work of finding bondsmen and securities for the money - which has exposed many a man to the tyranny of extents, either for himself or his friend, to his utter ruin, who under a more moderate prosecution had been able to pay all his debts, and by this method has been torn to pieces and disabled from making any tolerable proposal to his creditors.
    Here are a hundred and twenty-nine words in one sentence. The book from which it is taken, "An Essay upon Projects," averages more than sixty words to the sentence. How long is the average sentence today! It depends on the man, but in even the most literary prose it will not average more than thirty words. The average sentence of Macaulay's England is 23.43. Emerson's average sentence is less than that.

  • Alaa sabbagh - 2 years ago

    Im a disfunctional pussy i have fucked up feet and im uncoordinated

  • Alaa sabbagh - 2 years ago

    I’m a classic man

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    I love jenna nofal she makes me so horny i beat my dick once to her

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    Im the worst one on the football team my team doesnt like me because im gay and i always try to have one of them stick it up my ass

  • Hassan Shami - 2 years ago

    I love Jenna nofal she’s so sexy even tho she my cousin✊????

  • Leveon Bell - 2 years ago

    Yo I’ve been recruited heavily to THE. Crestwood Highschool Unversity and after seeing Hassan Shami play at center I am going to be taking my talent to Crestwood university

  • Alaa sabbagh - 2 years ago

    shami dick small OML

  • big titties shami - 2 years ago

    my tits huge

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    Im such a fat fuckin bitch im so horny all the time i just need someone to stick their dick up my belly button uhhh it feels so good

  • Hassan Shami - 2 years ago

    I’m such a dumbass I got caught egging a house

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    My favorite hobby is juuling i wont go a day without it they keep my tits healthy and i think im cool like if someone asks me if i know where a place is ill be like do i know where it is like this one time adam cassab asked me if i knew where taystees was and i was like do i know where taystees is

  • Sbbdbdbdbdh - 2 years ago

    A week ago a friend invited a couple of other couples over for dinner. Eventually, the food (but not the wine) was cleared off the table for what turned out to be some fierce Scrabbling. Heeding the strategy of going for the shorter, more valuable word over the longer cheaper word, our final play was “Bon,” which–as luck would have it!–happens to be a Japanese Buddhist festival, and not, as I had originally asserted while laying the tiles on the board, one half of a chocolate-covered cherry treat. Anyway, the strategy worked. My team only lost by 53 points instead of 58.

    Just the day before, our host had written of the challenges of writing short. In journalism–my friend’s chosen trade, and mostly my own, too–Mark Twain’s observation undoubtedly applies: “I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” The principle holds across genres, in letters, reporting, and other writing. It’s harder to be concise than to blather. (Full disclosure, this blog post will clock in at a blather-esque 803 words.) Good writing is boiled dowA week ago a friend invited a couple of other couples over for dinner. Eventually, the food (but not the wine) was cleared off the table for what turned out to be some fierce Scrabbling. Heeding the strategy of going for the shorter, more valuable word over the longer cheaper word, our final play was “Bon,” which–as luck would have it!–happens to be a Japanese Buddhist festival, and not, as I had originally asserted while laying the tiles on the board, one half of a chocolate-covered cherry treat. Anyway, the strategy worked. My team only lost by 53 points instead of 58.

    Just the day before, our host had written of the challenges of writing short. In journalism–my friend’s chosen trade, and mostly my own, too–Mark Twain’s observation undoubtedly applies: “I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” The principle holds across genres, in letters, reporting, and other writing. It’s harder to be concise than to blather. (Full disclosure, this blog post will clock in at a blather-esque 803 words.) Good writing is boiled dowA week ago a friend invited a couple of other couples over for dinner. Eventually, the food (but not the wine) was cleared off the table for what turned out to be some fierce Scrabbling. Heeding the strategy of going for the shorter, more valuable word over the longer cheaper word, our final play was “Bon,” which–as luck would have it!–happens to be a Japanese Buddhist festival, and not, as I had originally asserted while laying the tiles on the board, one half of a chocolate-covered cherry treat. Anyway, the strategy worked. My team only lost by 53 points instead of 58.

    Just the day before, our host had written of the challenges of writing short. In journalism–my friend’s chosen trade, and mostly my own, too–Mark Twain’s observation undoubtedly applies: “I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” The principle holds across genres, in letters, reporting, and other writing. It’s harder to be concise than to blather. (Full disclosure, this blog post will clock in at a blather-esque 803 words.) Good writing is boiled dow

  • Amir choker - 2 years ago

    I eat Husseini’s ass

  • Bxbxbd - 2 years ago

    A week ago a friend invited a couple of other couples over for dinner. Eventually, the food (but not the wine) was cleared off the table for what turned out to be some fierce Scrabbling. Heeding the strategy of going for the shorter, more valuable word over the longer cheaper word, our final play was “Bon,” which–as luck would have it!–happens to be a Japanese Buddhist festival, and not, as I had originally asserted while laying the tiles on the board, one half of a chocolate-covered cherry treat. Anyway, the strategy worked. My team only lost by 53 points instead of 58.

    Just the day before, our host had written of the challenges of writing short. In journalism–my friend’s chosen trade, and mostly my own, too–Mark Twain’s observation undoubtedly applies: “I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” The principle holds across genres, in letters, reporting, and other writing. It’s harder to be concise than to blather. (Full disclosure, this blog post will clock in at a blather-esque 803 words.) Good writing is boiled dowA week ago a friend invited a couple of other couples over for dinner. Eventually, the food (but not the wine) was cleared off the table for what turned out to be some fierce Scrabbling. Heeding the strategy of going for the shorter, more valuable word over the longer cheaper word, our final play was “Bon,” which–as luck would have it!–happens to be a Japanese Buddhist festival, and not, as I had originally asserted while laying the tiles on the board, one half of a chocolate-covered cherry treat. Anyway, the strategy worked. My team only lost by 53 points instead of 58.

    Just the day before, our host had written of the challenges of writing short. In journalism–my friend’s chosen trade, and mostly my own, too–Mark Twain’s observation undoubtedly applies: “I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” The principle holds across genres, in letters, reporting, and other writing. It’s harder to be concise than to blather. (Full disclosure, this blog post will clock in at a blather-esque 803 words.) Good writing is boiled dow

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    My dicks so small ask julianna she couldnt suck it so i just ate her out

  • Djjfjf - 2 years ago

    A week ago a friend invited a couple of other couples over for dinner. Eventually, the food (but not the wine) was cleared off the table for what turned out to be some fierce Scrabbling. Heeding the strategy of going for the shorter, more valuable word over the longer cheaper word, our final play was “Bon,” which–as luck would have it!–happens to be a Japanese Buddhist festival, and not, as I had originally asserted while laying the tiles on the board, one half of a chocolate-covered cherry treat. Anyway, the strategy worked. My team only lost by 53 points instead of 58.

    Just the day before, our host had written of the challenges of writing short. In journalism–my friend’s chosen trade, and mostly my own, too–Mark Twain’s observation undoubtedly applies: “I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” The principle holds across genres, in letters, reporting, and other writing. It’s harder to be concise than to blather. (Full disclosure, this blog post will clock in at a blather-esque 803 words.) Good writing is boiled dow

  • Dbbdbd - 2 years ago

    HjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhbA week ago a friend invited a couple of other couples over for dinner. Eventually, the food (but not the wine) was cleared off the table for what turned out to be some fierce Scrabbling. Heeding the strategy of going for the shorter, more valuable word over the longer cheaper word, our final play was “Bon,” which–as luck would have it!–happens to be a Japanese Buddhist festival, and not, as I had originally asserted while laying the tiles on the board, one half of a chocolate-covered cherry treat. Anyway, the strategy worked. My team only lost by 53 points instead of 58.

    Just the day before, our host had written of the challenges of writing short. In journalism–my friend’s chosen trade, and mostly my own, too–Mark Twain’s observation undoubtedly applies: “I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” The principle holds across genres, in letters, reporting, and other writing. It’s harder to be concise than to blather. (Full disclosure, this blog post will clock in at a blather-esque 803 words.) Good writing is boiled dow

  • Hassan Shami - 2 years ago

    I fugged julianna’s hairy ass

  • A - 2 years ago

    Hdhdhdh

  • Bbsbdbd - 2 years ago

    Dhhdhdbd

  • Dnbdbdb - 2 years ago

    Shhdhdbdbd

  • Yee - 2 years ago

    Shhdhdhdh

  • Yee - 2 years ago

    R

  • Yee - 2 years ago

    C

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    Coach take me out i need one thats all i say cuz every step i take i lose all my breath cuz im a fat loser

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    Julianna queefed in my face and she shit on my dick so i slapped her

  • Mugsy - 2 years ago

    I fucked julianna also

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    I hate coach saleh cuz he tries copying my dads hairstyle haha

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    Friday gonna be a big game

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    Im a fat fuck i like to juul soon ill be smoking cigarettes and weed

  • Ahaa - 2 years ago

    Noice

  • Hassan shamtities - 2 years ago

    When i get married im gonna be breastfeeding the kids but im kinda worried because i have a chode and it wont be able to fit inside some guys asshole

  • Amir chokr - 2 years ago

    I always buzz my hair cause joviel Terrels and I suck bbcs all day cause black jizz tastes way better

  • Hassan ShaTITS - 2 years ago

    i’m a fat loser i juul for fun and i fucked julianaa hard in her asshole

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    I suck dick i dont even know why im starting #prayforhoumani because i dont deserve this spot i almost cost my team the game and i have a fuckin cowlick

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    ????????

  • hassan shatits - 2 years ago

    My tits are huge when i’m horny i suck them always cuz i’m gay ya

  • Adam husseini - 2 years ago

    Ahaaa I like dick and I fucked nazems dad so hard he dropped 100 pounds

  • Adam husseini - 2 years ago

    Yo my barber been fuckin my life up

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    Nazem harb jizzed on my dads head and my dad lost his hair

  • Amir chokr - 2 years ago

    I work at true zuris I give 5$ blowjobs

  • Hassan Shami - 2 years ago

    My dad takes it in the asshole from my mom and we have kids always

  • Adam husseini - 2 years ago

    Thurston taking this one easily

  • Nazem harb - 2 years ago

    Im a faggot i almost quit cuz i didnt get my jersey size and i try to impress girts

  • Amir chokr - 2 years ago

    I take it in the asshole

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    My dads BALD

  • #3 midget mugsy - 2 years ago

    Fuck crestwood, y’all niggas ass bro thurston boutta win

  • Nazem Harv - 2 years ago

    I’m terrel at football just trying to impress the colors

  • Jibrael abuahmed - 2 years ago

    My name is jibrael abuahmedzuris and you’re watching disney channel lil im unicorn

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    ahaa chokrs a dick sucker

  • Hassan shami - 2 years ago

    When i run i trip over my tits people laugh at me but truth is without my tits i wouldnt be alive because i need the breast milk

  • hassan shami - 2 years ago

    my tits huge OML

  • Nazem Harb - 2 years ago

    Ahaaa we terrel go thurston

  • Dallas - 2 years ago

    Thurston fasho about to take this dub! ????

  • Papi j - 2 years ago

    Fuck Thurston high lets get this dub cwood

  • Hassan Shami - 2 years ago

    I swear I’m the worst player on the team I shouldn’t even be starting, go chargers!

  • Jeff - 2 years ago

    Vote anchor bay..⚓️????

  • HenriettA. Carr - 2 years ago

    Go CLARKSTON wolves

  • HenriettA. Carr - 2 years ago

    Go CLARKSTON wolves

  • Suppa hot - 2 years ago

    Daddy dick in my tight pussy let’s go credtwood chargers so u can charge that dick in my pussy

  • Papi cholo - 2 years ago

    Vote crestwood if ur not gay

  • Bitch nigga - 2 years ago

    Vote Crestwood you bums

  • Football Mom - 2 years ago

    Go Falcons! Vote for Rochester HS!

  • Janis - 2 years ago

    Rochester High please

  • Rene Dingess - 2 years ago

    please come on my downriver friends Please VOTE! for Monroe Jefferson at New Boston Huron

  • Lisa - 2 years ago

    Vote for New Boston! GO CHIEFS!

  • Ruth - 2 years ago

    Vote for West Bloomfield vs. Clarkston! Number 2 vs. 12! WB Going to Ford Field again in November!

  • Jill M Stevenson - 2 years ago

    Vote for ANCHOR BAY ! GO TARS.
    1973 Graduate.

  • Matthew - 2 years ago

    Vote vote vote for Anchor Bay at Port Huron !!! Keep on voting vote vote for anchor bay at port Huron !!!

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