Ed Next Poll: Which three are the top books of the decade? (Poll Closed)

  • Richard D. Kahlenberg. All Together Now: Creating Middle-Class Schools Through Public School Choice. (Brookings Institution Press, 2001)
    <1%

     
  • Terry M. Moe. Schools, Vouchers, and the American Public. (Brookings Institution Press, 2001)
    <1%

     
  • William G. Howell and Paul E. Peterson. The Education Gap: Vouchers And Urban Schools. (Brookings Institution Press, 2002)
    <1%

     
  • Deborah Meier. In Schools We Trust: Creating Communities of Learning in an Era of Testing and Standardization. (Beacon Press, 2002)
    5%

     
  • William G. Ouchi. Making Schools Work: A Revolutionary Plan to Get Your Children the Education They Need. (Simon & Schuster, 2003)
    <1%

     
  • Abigail Thernstrom. No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning (Simon & Schuster, 2003)
    1%

     
  • Richard Elmore. School Reform From The Inside Out: Policy, Practice and Performance. (Harvard Education Press, 2004)
    1%

     
  • Frederick M. Hess. Common Sense School Reform. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004)
    1%

     
  • Jay P. Greene. Education Myths: What Special Interest Groups Want You to Believe About Our Schools--And Why It Isn't So. (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc, 2005)
    2%

     
  • Joanne Jacobs, Our School: The Inspiring Story of Two Teachers, One Big Idea, and the School That Beat the Odds. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005)
    <1%

     
  • Joe Williams, Cheating Our Kids: How Politics and Greed Ruin Education. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005)
    2%

     
  • E. D. Hirsch. The Knowledge Deficit: Closing the Shocking Education Gap for American Children. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2006)
    9%

     
  • Alfie Kohn. The Homework Myth. (Da Capo Press, 2006)
    4%

     
  • Karin Chenoweth. "It's Being Done": Academic Success in Unexpected Schools. (Harvard Education Press, 2007)
    7%

     
  • Gareth Davies. See Government Grow: Education Politics from Johnson to Reagan. (University Press of Kansas, 2007)
    <1%

     
  • Richard D. Kahlenberg. Tough Liberal: Albert Shanker and the Battles Over Schools, Unions, Race, and Democracy. (Columbia University Press, 2007)
    1%

     
  • Linda Perlstein. Tested: One American School Struggles to Make the Grade (Henry Holt, 2007)
    2%

     
  • Clayton Christensen, Curtis W. Johnson, Michael B. Horn. Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns. (McGraw-Hill, 2008)
    3%

     
  • Chester E. Finn Jr. Troublemaker: A Personal History of School Reform since Sputnik. (Princeton University Press, 2008)
    1%

     
  • Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz. The Race between Education and Technology (Belknap Press, 2008)
    1%

     
  • Jeffrey R. Henig. Spin Cycle: How Research Is Used in Policy Debates: The Case of Charter Schools. (Russell Sage Foundation Publications, 2008)
    <1%

     
  • Daniel Koretz. Measuring Up: What Educational Testing Really Tells Us. (Harvard University Press, 2008)
    2%

     
  • Charles Murray. Real Education: Four Simple Truths for Bringing America's Schools Back to Reality. (Three Rivers Press, 2008)
    2%

     
  • Charles M. Payne. So Much Reform, So Little Change: The Persistence of Failure in Urban Schools. (Harvard Education Press, 2008)
    2%

     
  • Paul Tough. Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada's Quest to Change Harlem and America. (Mariner Books, 2008)
    2%

     
  • Tony Wagner. The Global Achievement Gap (Basic Books, 2008)
    2%

     
  • David Whitman. Sweating the Small Stuff (Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2008)
    1%

     
  • David K. Cohen and Susan L. Moffitt. The Ordeal of Equality: Did Federal Regulation Fix the Schools? (Harvard University Press, 2009)
    2%

     
  • Linda Darling-Hammond. The Flat World and Education: How America's Commitment to Equity Will Determine Our Future. (Teachers College Press, 2009)
    8%

     
  • Gerald Grant. Hope and Despair in the American City: Why There Are No Bad Schools in Raleigh (Harvard University Press, 2009)
    1%

     
  • Eric A. Hanushek, Alfred A. Lindseth. Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses: Solving the Funding-Achievement Puzzle in America's Public Schools (Princeton University Press, 2009)
    1%

     
  • Jay Mathews. Work Hard. Be Nice.: How Two Inspired Teachers Created the Most Promising Schools in America. (Algonquin Books, 2009)
    2%

     
  • Terry Moe and John Chubb. Liberating Learning: Technology, Politics, and the Future of American Education. (Jossey-Bass, 2009)
    <1%

     
  • James Tooley. The Beautiful Tree: A Personal Journey Into How the World's Poorest People Are Educating Themselves. (Cato Institute, 2009)
    1%

     
  • Daniel T. Willingham. Why Don't Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom. (Jossey-Bass, 2009)
    6%

     
  • Anthony S. Bryk et. al. Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago. (University Of Chicago Press, 2010)
    3%

     
  • Frederick M. Hess. Education Unbound: The Promise and Practice of Greenfield Schooling. (Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development, 2010)
    1%

     
  • Paul T. Hill. Learning as We Go: Why School Choice is Worth the Wait. (Hoover Institution Press, 2010)
    1%

     
  • Paul E. Peterson. Saving Schools: From Horace Mann to Virtual Learning. (Harvard University Press, 2010)
    1%

     
  • Diane Ravitch. The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education. (Basic Books, 2010)
    22%

     
  • Marguerite Roza. Educational Economics (Urban Institute Press, 2010)
    2%

     

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3 Comments

  • Shelley Gordon - 9 years ago

    Sandy, you are so wise. Thank you for sharing that wisdom. I hope it will be heard. That said, I hope citizens like yourself come to the defense of teachers and public education. Each time teachers do so, they are accused by people like Michelle Rhee, Oprah, Bill Gates, Arne Duncan, ad safely our President, of being concerned only with adult issues and resistant to "change". We all know this to be intentional misrepresentation on the part of the special interests who are dedicated to destroying public education and replacing it with privatized services. They have worked overtime to convince Americans that it's teachers are both lazy and inept.

    Teachers and their professional organizations want our kids to have the best education in the world. To that end, they will not endorse ideas that are proven to be harmful or ineffectual. High stakes testing, school choice/charter schools, Race to the Top, No Child Left Behind all fall into the failure arena. The war being waged against teachers and teachers unions by faux reformer groups is wasting time and ultimately irrepairably destructive.

    So, Sandy, help to organize your friends, neighbors, coworkers and other citizens to fight with teachers to save public education from these misguided and Machiavellian reformers.

  • Sandy Silvers - 9 years ago

    I am not an educator but a concerned senior citizen who was trained that each generation must pass the world to the next generation better than when he began his life. How can so many educators not organize the general public to understand how much damage is being done to our educational system by both political parties? What good is the measurement of how one can read or calculate if you do not develop all the tools that God has given us...whether it be the beauty of poetry, the knowledge of history, playing a musical instrument or being physically fit? What happen to our appreciation for the people who dedicated themselves to education? This must change or we will continue our slide in the world.

  • Tammy M. Steele - 9 years ago

    The most important research in the past two decades was done with preschool children and is still not widely used in making educational decisions. Betty Hart and Todd Risley's, Meaningfull Differences is critical to the understanding of a child's ability to acquire language and word knowledge. The work of High Scope Research Foundation in it's longitudinal study of preschool children and adult decisionmaking as well as the longitudinal work of the ABCDerian and Chicago Parent Child Centers which confirms High Scope's findings, are not well known by educational decision makers despite the high quality of the research and the repercussions of itheir findings.

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