Do you think that 60-year-old Ablene Cooper, who worked as a nanny for Stockett’s brother has a valid case against Katherine Stockett, author of The Help? (Poll Closed)

  • YES
    15.11%
    42 votes

     
  • NO
    78.78%
    219 votes

     
  • UNDECIDED
    6.12%
    17 votes

     

Posted 8 years.

10 Comments

  • gavin rose - 8 years ago

    C'mon Ms. Cooper, give me a break, I am african american, grew up in the 60's, have read the book and seen the movie, both are good. This is a frivolous lawsuit meant to make money in hard times. Please, spend time doing something more meaningful like helping the homeless.

  • Lou - 8 years ago

    The book is FICTION. The facts in the book , were very HONEST & TRUE. I grew up in Jackson, as a transplant. I was terrified as a child to move to MS, I was old enough to have a child's understading of the Civil Rights movement! I am now 55 and am proud, & ashamed of our history. But the southern comunity in general, ALL CITIZENS, are warm, open, welcoming & nonjudgemental. My experience has shown that other communities, though friendly, can't hold a candle to the south! We are also more intelligent than we sound!
    Research Civil Rights and Jim Crow and you can better underdstand the hypocrisy of the south.
    The Tuskegee Experiment, Henrietta Lacks...etc, we treated the black community worse than Hitler and his experimentation!

  • Pearljohn - 8 years ago

    I wish I had someone as caring and wonderful as these ladies were portrayed through my growing up years. They were wonderful examples of dignity and grace considering what they went through. I love the movie and enjoyed the book. I saw it with my husband and 33 yrd. old son in NC, the movie brought tears to each of us. The south was what it was. While in NC we went to the Woolworth museum in Greensboro. Being from Ohio, I growing up in the 60's/70's we didn't experience the unfairness and the treatment blacks received. We didn't consider our black friends as black, they were considered our friends. It would have been a honor to have such dedicated ladies helping me maintain my home. Even today the world still has rude & inconsiderate people white & black. I am glad to see that this movie is getting people's attention.
    And yes I would also give $75.000 to the lady mentioned, it's called doing the right thing. The author will be reaping ten fold....................

  • Linda S - 8 years ago

    I am 62, I grew up in Mississippi and Tennessee. My first job (thank God it was for a short period) was a maid, my mother was a maid, my grandmother was a maid. I don't believe ALL white mistresses were like Hilly, and all maids were like the maids depicted. The conditions that the maids worked under DID exist, but not with all white families. And there are some situations that existed that are even worse, that are not depicted in the book or movie. Why do people have a problem with the TRUTH?? Oh and by the way, the laws that made it illegal for balcks and whites to come together, DID exist.

  • Cindy Proctor - 8 years ago

    Ms. Johnson -- thank you very much for your candid explanation. While you and your family were rare to find, please forgive my generalization. No, not meant to depict the movie as racist, it was how it hit me as I went into the movie without having read anything about the movie, nor did I read the book. I have a tendancy to read between the lines, what are they really saying??? Perceptions are in the eye of the beholder, yes ?

  • Sue Johnson - 8 years ago

    I grew up in Mississippi in the 40' and 50's. And yes, we did have "help." Our help used the same bathroom in the house that we did. We had "help" because my mother worked outside the home. The ideas that the "help" had different diseases than we did was meant to show how stupid the white character was, not to infer that the "black" help actually had different diseases. There were Afro-American children I was allowed to play with--and white children I was not allowed to play with. Quit trying to make this a racist movie. It made the white people look like stupid, bad guys while showing the "help" pretty much as they really were. Any racism, not a part of the movie, is in your minds. While many whites were ignorant and racist, we were not, as a rule, like the characters in the movie.

  • Cindy - 8 years ago

    I watched the film this past weekend. Although no one has picked up on this, I was truly offended by the sly remarks and subtle suggestion that Black folk are the reason there is disease in the white community. At one point, the comment was made: they have different diseases than we do. Then, in a later segment, after the "master" had consumed the "pie", the later show her with what looks like a "Herpes" outbreak on her lips. The most incredulous hyprocacy shown, I found, was when the showed a booklet and I did not get the exact name, something about laws governing associating with "black folk" and their rules. Such as you could not touch them. Well -- I have a problem with this in that is was okay for the "Help" to hold their babies (which I found incredulous), change their diapers and console them when these parents belittled their children, hit them, etc. They even showed where the mother had not changed her baby all night. They call black folks lazy and shiftless, but yet there were lazy when it came to cleaning, cooking, and caring for their families. WHAT HYPOCRITES.

  • Cindy Baker - 8 years ago

    I agree with Joan

  • Joan Allert - 8 years ago

    I can't decide what would really be the appropriate thing that the author should do. If I wrote this book and saw the way these wonderful women loved these children I think I would just give this women the $75,000 dollars and feel good about it!

  • Don - 8 years ago

    I found the movie to be very factual and realistic, based on my experience of growing up in the south, specifically a small town in North Carolina. What was accepted then is considered
    to be offensive now - but it happened!

    GREAT MOVIE!

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