Who should be voted the most the most inspirational black man or woman? (Poll Closed)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
39 Comments

  • O. Alade Adelaja - 9 years ago

    Pastor Agu Irukwu, is an epitome of excellence whose impact has affected the entire generation of his time. He deserves nothing but the best, and the best is yet to come. He has one unique attribute and that is willingness to encourage and lift people up. He also use inspirational words to challenge people not only to discover their gifts, but also to develop and excel in them. Ride on Pastor Agu and continue to excel in what you enjoy doing best.

  • Maryann - 9 years ago

    Thank you all for voting Pastor Agu Irukwu, he is a very inspirational black man and has affected the lives of the youths of this generation. Thank you and remain blessed.

  • DIPO ONAOLA - 9 years ago

    To everyone that voted him as the most inspirationl black man, you have done well.
    Pastor Agwu Irukwu is indeed the right man. Thank you all.

  • Adeoti Onaola - 9 years ago

    When Jesus says "YES", nobody can say "No". Pastor Agwu Irukwu is "God''s Elect".

    You are indeed the most inspirational black man. Congratulations and keep the flag flying.

  • Adeoti Onaola - 9 years ago

    When Jesus says "YES", nobody can say "No". Pastor Agwu Irukwu is "God''s Elect".

    You are indeed the best inspirational African Leader of our time. Congratulations and keep the flag flying.

  • florence - 9 years ago

    Thank God It is PASTOR AGWU,PASTOR AGWU,PASTOR AGWU AGAIN AND AGAIN PLS

  • Wale Fasogbon - 9 years ago

    This is the most ridiculous vote of all times. It is insulting and uninpiring. The Mayor of London who initiated this is to my mind a very intelligent man. But for him to be so narrow minded as to think that this kind of exercise will edify the black man shows how low he rates the black man. Can we consider the most inspirational white man of all times for a change? Where will you start and where will you end?
    I think metro should not allow itself to be used in this exercise to ridicle the black man.
    The short list confirms that this exercise should never have been allowed to see the light of day.
    There should have been some more intelligent interventions.
    Please STOP this exercise now and stop MOCKING the black man
    This exercise in mockery should STOP NOW!!!

  • Ayodele Dada - 9 years ago

    Wonderful Minister of GOD!

  • pauline Gordon - 9 years ago

    Should have been separated into categories rather than lumped together. I voted for Oprah as I think she is very inspirational, although she is rich, she give and gives, because money is not the most important thing, its wisdom, knowledge and understanding. I would have also liked to vote for. Martin Luther King, Dianne Nash.

  • Okorafor Richard - 9 years ago

    Quite an absurd list Rio, Naomi Campbell, very funny what about REV chris Oyakhilome he is more inspiring than all this lots here

  • erica riddell - 9 years ago

    I think Leona Lewis should be given the vote because she represents hope and she is an inspiration to all young people whose dream is to become a professional artist. Her story does not involve politics, but an ambitious young lady who is living her dream.

  • chuka - 9 years ago

    @Sandra: UR head no correct, which means u r a mad hatter!

    The people have voted,
    if they considered King most important they would have vote for him !

    Pastor Agu is relevant now, King was then!

    I guess ur retarded, If not then you have a very low IQ!

    Or at maybe you were dropped on your head when you were born or something!

    @Susan: I feel you!

    PS
    @sandra: if ur retarded then I guess u dont understand what u wrote, then I blame the person who let u use a PC!

  • Isabelle - 9 years ago

    I feel that this list is comprised of too many people from too many different places/ times and sectors. Like some have previously commented, there seems to be a need for a few different voting categories, rather than having them all thrown together. However, instead of only seeing the negative side, I am inclined to be thankful for the fact that there is some form of recognition taking place (of which it is the first of this kind to my knowledge). With many things that we do as humans, we often get it wrong the first few times and each mistake made is simply a lesson learnt (if we are wise).

    I am not one to really get excited over Black History month, but this does not negate from the fact that this is the month that has been set aside for us to remember the people who fought and struggled for us and to celebrate our achievements etc. I don't believe it is pigeon holing us and saying we must keep silent at all other times. In fact, just as you have a day set out for Mothers day, it doesn't mean you can't celebrate Mothers on any other day you choose to, it is the same with Black History month.

    Yes, we may not all agree with the nominees, we probably don't know all of the nominees but that does not mean that they haven't been inspirational or are not deserving of the title at this time. Let us embrace this, vote if you really feel led to do so and leave constructive criticism in the hope that it will get back to the right people and something will be done about it next time around.

  • Isabelle - 9 years ago

    I feel that this list is comprised of too many people from too many different places/ times and sectors. Like some have previously commented, there seems to be a need for a few different voting categories, rather than having them all thrown together. However, instead of only seeing the negative side, I am inclined to be thankful for the fact that there is some form of recognition taking place (of which it is the first of this kind to my knowledge). With many things that we do as humans, we often get it wrong the first few times and each mistake made is simply a lesson learnt (if we are wise).

    I am not one to really get excited over Black History month, but this does not negate from the fact that this is the month that has been set aside for us to remember the people who fought and struggled for us and to celebrate our achievements etc. I don't believe it is pigeon holing us and saying we must keep silent at all other times. In fact, just as you have a day set out for Mothers day, it doesn't mean you can't celebrate Mothers on any other day you choose to, it is the same with Black History month.

    Yes, we may not all agree with the nominees, we probably don't know all of the nominees but that does not mean that they haven't been inspirational or are not deserving of the title at this time. Let us embrace this, vote if you really feel led to do so and leave constructive criticism in the hope that it will get back to the right people and something will be done about it next time around.

  • Lynn Ibironke - 9 years ago

    went thru the list. was not too impressed. But one name stand out among the rest...Pastor Agu Irukwu. One of the leading most inspirational speaker in Uk today. If his name was not there the list would have been useless to me. Thank You Pastor Agu for your continuous effort in changing lives. You have surely changed mine.

  • Patrick Adekunle - 9 years ago

    Levi Roots? Rio Ferdinand??Leona Lewis???Idris Elba????Naomi?!!!! for pete's sake!!!imagine what the world would think of us if these people actually won!!!

  • SUSAN JOHNSON - 9 years ago

    Is this for real or one big joke? Did someone actually sit down and call this a survey of the most Inspirational Black man or woman. First of all, he/she should be penalized for making out a survey list under the influence, b/c that is the only excuse I can give for this balderdash.
    To begin with, who are 3/4 of these people? Where are they from? What have they contributed to the advancement of the Black Community, in Africa or the diaspora. How have they encouraged the Black race, in whatever little way available to them? Then I see names like Naomi Campbell. Come on people, tell me it's a joke. Naomi Campbell? For what? How to behave badly, how to use even more drugs or how to throw without missing? I see no names like those of our fore-fathers, who paid the ultimate price for us to be free. I see no names of Blacks who have encouraged other blacks that education is the key. All I see here are Blacks who do what they do for their own self- aggrandizement. Blacks for whom avarice and mendacity is the order of the day. I am not looking for saints people, just human beings who tried/try, who truly believe that the Black Race can do anything they set their mind to do and who encourage (not for ratings) other Black people to stand up and answer the call. That Black is beautiful, Black is wholesome, and that the sky is not the limit if we so desire. Where is Nnamdi Azikiwe? (he is dead, but then so is Martin Luther King). Where is Awolowo? Where is Patrice Lumumba? Where is Malcolm X? For goodness sake, I don't even see Michael Jordan's name up there, but I see Campbell and a host of non-entities.
    Well, as required, I vote. But not for any on above stated list. I vote for my father, the late Hon. Justice T.C. Anomnachi, mni. Any and every one who came in contact with him, will testify to this, that he inspired them every day of their lives to be the best they could ever be, educationally, spiritually, financially and otherwise. He might have only touched hundreds of people, but it left a lasting impression on them. At his funeral and beyond, testimonies came forth of scholarships granted, graduates trained, families bailed out in times of need. Projects to benefit others that even his family never knew about. He instilled a pride for Nigeria and Africa as a whole in his family. He thought his children that education, not money is the key. People suffer from lack of knowledge, but with an education, you can look any one eye ball to eye ball, and not be subservient. He made us mini freedom fighters. He taught us to despise injustice in all it's ramification. To shy away from greed and corruption. To be our brothers' keeper. To help others, even to our own detriment. To always put others before self. That integrity and honesty will go far to make a change in the society. He led a transparent life, and tried his utmost to do his best each day. He was not a rich man, but he was a man with a beautiful heart. A heart that did not see race, creed, color or religion. Only brotherhood. That is why I vote TCA is MY most inspirational Black man.

  • Sandra - 9 years ago

    I'm disgusted to find that nobody voted for Martin Luther King, is it ignorance or what? without him we would all still be in chains. And who the hell is Leona Lewis? what has she done for society or how has she changed perceptions over the years..Lets give credit to who credit is due.

  • Emma Brooks - 9 years ago

    I have voted for Doreen Lawrence for her commitment to seeking justice for Stephen despite facing the most awful situation that any of us could imagine. She has remained dignified throughout and is an inspirational woman.

  • Dan - 9 years ago

    Tommie Smith and John Carlos? Bob Marley? Malcom X? Rosa Parks? Joseph Cinque? Even people like Leadbelly and Muddy Waters are more inspirational than questionable entries like Leona Lewis, Rio Ferdinand and Levi Roots... I'm not black myself, nor do I consider myself to be an expert on black history or inspirations, but it's clear to me that there are some significant omissions from this list.

  • David Wainwright - 9 years ago

    As a white English boy growing up in the 1960s and 1970s, it was music that provided the catalyst for me to appreciate the talents and contribution to humanity of black people. It disappoints me enormously, therefore, not to see Berry Gordy on your shortlist. This african-american giant, who founded Motown records in 1959, went on to discover and/or nurture the talents of Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson and Marvin Gaye, amongst many others, and ran a company that became America's most successful black-owned business at a time when the obstacles to such success would have been insuperable to almost anybody else, deserves to be lauded, held in high esteem and given a place on your shortlist. It is almost certain that this man's creation has given me more hours of unalloyed pleasure over the decades than any other, regardless of race, and his omission is shameful.

  • Abimbola Alonge - 9 years ago

    I don't see Rosa Parks??? Didn't she refuse to give up her seat and make a statement for black people....

    I see Naomi Campbell, wasn't she linked with physically assaulting her maid and smuggling blood diamond....

    I do not understand this! A few people on this list deserve to be there, the others are just celebrities known for sports, Ferdinard and music or stardom, as someone said this is just another X Factor list minus the few real heroes on the list like Martin Luther, Obama, Agu Irukwu, Oprah (yes Oprah because she has helped build a lot of foundations and donated billions to NGOs worldwide)...

  • lee jasper - 9 years ago

    Cont....Whilst protected from critical media inquiry or challenge by a largely supine media and in that context well able to deflect criticism by simply refusing to answer the questions or announcing some ill thought out new tokenistic policy solution he manages to deftly avoid all sustained political attacks. Boris Johnson recent interview with Jeremy Paxman provides a perfect and most recent example. Whilst we can all agree that Paxman has lost his edge it is quite nauseating to see a politician given such an inexplicably easy ride.

    In relation to black communities in London his assessment is that as a community we don’t not vote in big numbers and he can afford to ignore us.

    As a response we need to launch the largest voter registration drive ever seen in the capital in the run up to the next Mayoral election.

    If the inner London voter registration and turnout can be increased by around 10% then the political importance and significance attached to those issues that effect our communities will be hugely increased.

    London’s Mayor has reduced Black History Month to the status of an X Factor competition, complete and utter drivel. In and of itself not really that important however taken together with his general political failure to meet the needs of the London’s black communities we can see its real significance.

  • Ralph Daley - 9 years ago

    Please excuse me as I compose myself after reading through the most nonsensical list imaginable. I won't waste my time though on stating who actually should be on this list but confine myself to commenting on the absurdity of the need for such an "inverted piece of piffle". This list is ill thought out, patronising, paternalistic and borderline racist but Borris probably would not see it that way. The real problem for Borris is people like me who were ambiguous regarding politics but is now active due in part to the uncaring right wing buffoonery of this preposterous oaf.

  • jackie sear - 9 years ago

    Its a shame that this is the only contribution to balck history month that the Mayors office seems to have made.
    I salute all the people who are campaigning to ensure their youth clubs, services and activities in the communities where we all live survive and celebrate the black culture and identity. This will ensure the future generations of adults and parents will be able to bring their children into a world where access to justice and fairness is not down to colour or income.
    restore the funding, stop being short sighted and as for this tokenism it is more like an insult than a contribution

  • Lee Jasper - 9 years ago

    Boris Johnson London Black History Month competition is derisory.

    For Boris de Pfeffle Johnson Mayor of London the concept of Black History Month has always be seen as waste of money and nothing more than political propaganda. Having slashed the BHM budget by 92% last year reducing the funding from a respectable £132,000 to a paltry £10,000 his paltry effort this year speaks volumes about the Mayor’s perception of the importance of London’s Black Communities.

    Against the backdrop of the summer riots that were ignited in part by the massive increase in the number of black men who suffered suspicious deaths in police custody such as Smiley Culture, Demetre Fraser and Mark Duggan and over the last 3 years a staggering 300% increase in the rate of police stop and search Boris recognised that he has to be seen to be doing something.

    Anger is palpable in London’s Black communities and police black community relations are worse now than I have seen them in the last 30 years. The reason for that is Boris just does not do race. He sees it as an anathema and his strategy on race has been to do the bare minimum with the maximum publicity

    So this year, the year before the Mayoral elections he has launched a Black History Month competition with the London Metro asking Londoners to vote for their most “ Inspirational Black Person” from a long list of assorted media, political and sports stars.

    Hilariously and as a result of the acute shortage of senior black staff at city hall his officials were reported to be ringing round black organisations asking for the telephone numbers of long deceased historical figures such as Marcus Garvey and Claudia Jones

    This tawdry effort amounts to nothing more an inverted mountain of celebrity piffle. Johnson calculation is that as a celebrity obsessed community we will forget about black men being shot dead by police officers on the streets of London and vote like demented lemmings for our celebrity Back History Month idol.

    Often cited as controversial politically Johnson is a fake maverick, a deeply conservative right wing one trick pony but nevertheless he is undoubtedly a first class charming and effective communicator.

    Boris has developed the dark art of obfuscation utilising that English Wodenhousian bluster, stuffed with historical quotes and finely honed in the raucous Bullingdon Club debates at Eton. This is Johnsons favourite and I have to say most effective modus operandi. He provides proof, if proof were needed, of the validity of a quote by Napoleon Bonaparte “ In politics, absurdity is not a handicap.”

    Boris is best summed up as personally charming. Intellectually funny and politically incompetent

    His outward public approach to black people is best described as a rather charming benign patronism whilst his political decisions reveal his true psychology. Massive cuts to black employment and cultural projects of all kinds across the capital the destabilising of Notting Hill Carnival, failure to tackle serious youth crime and failure ensure his top team reflects London.

    His steadfast refusal to formally acknowledge 23rd August Trans Atlantic Slavery Memorial Day despite repeated request that he be seen to recognise both the involvement of London in the slave trade and the huge financial benefit to the capital is quite simply an outrage.

    In my own humble assessment I get the impression that Boris and host team think black people are politically chaotic, easy to please and for the most part emotionally and intellectually naïve.

    He has the ability to charm and audience and by and large at those black public events I have attended the audience, reacts to him with smiles and warm applause. His celebrity and millionaire persona exert a charismatic political alchemy that appeals to poor people seeking to gain political patronage.

    Whilst protected from critical media inquiry or challenge by a largely supine media and in that context well able to defl

  • Dele Oluwole - 9 years ago

    hmmnnn .... what a controversial list. The best and most accountable list is in the custody of the Almighty God.

  • Benny - 9 years ago

    Is it the most inspirational black of our time or of all times? If it is of all time, it will be Pastor Enoch Adeboye. Inspiring people has to do with their spirit not sensual desires.

  • lara - 9 years ago

    lol. love this list

  • Zain - 9 years ago

    LEONA LEWIS, THANDIE NEWTON, RONKE PHILIPS, are you serious??? I thought we could add people to the list. How about Samuel Delany, Octavia E Butler or Aaron McGruder??? Can't believe the omission of Malcolm X, a character so powerful he had to be killed to maintain the status quo.

  • Ian - 9 years ago

    I read through this list and was surprised not to see people like Paul Cuffee one of the wealthiest Americans in the early 19th Century who was half black and half Native American? What about Lieutenant Walter Tull the second black professional football player in the UK and first black Infantry Officer who fought and died a hero in the first world war? My personal hero however is Captain John Perkins. Perkins was the first black officer in the service of the crown and fought throughout the late 18th and early 19th Century. He managed, through his skill and determination, to be promoted to post-captain (a senior naval rank) in a time when slavery was still legal throughout the British Empire. He was a remarkable man. I am amazed that his story is not taught in schools and more so that he is missing from this list.

  • Craig - 9 years ago

    Some really interesting candidates, but MLK and Mandela have been so important in recent history that at least in my opinion, no one can hold a candle th them, especially celebrities like Oprah an Michael Jackson who are both probablt more famous for making money than changing the world. Apparently Naomi Campbell even gets a nod just for being gorgeous. Since when did "being gorgeous" shake the world more than a sofa?

  • Kemi Olasode - 9 years ago

    I am so happy that Agu Irukwu is one of the nominees. In fact if i have the chance, i would vote him over and over and over again.

  • Kathleen Connors - 9 years ago

    I love Mr Atkinson and I think he should win.

  • Rob Wellburn - 9 years ago

    I am gravely disappointed that Cleo de Jong who has inspired hundreds of inner city youth has been omitted from this list.
    It's preposterous.

  • Meha - 9 years ago

    I would like to reiterate this point that this list is absurd.

    You cannot just group random black people together and ask people to vote for their favourite.
    At the very least this should have been broken down into categories, musicians, politicians etc.

  • Usman - 9 years ago

    I was suprised to see that the king of pop - Michael Jackson who revolutionised pop music for genertaions to come being omitted from this list.

  • Abdur El Ghawi - 9 years ago

    Very shocking list. When I read the title, straight away I thought of Bob Marley. Bob Marley ranks among the most popular figures in modern culture. No doubt, Bob Marley was worth far more. What about Pele, who is widely regarded as the greatest football player of all time. Where are Marcus Garvey and Malcolm X?. What about Harriet Tubman, the poor black woman who was born into slavery and then become one of the best known figures of the nineteenth century.
    Very disappointing list indeed.

  • Markie Raye - 9 years ago

    I must say that this is a most rediculous list for most inspirational black man/woman!! How can you have models, actors and athletes who did very little or nothing for freedom or the advancement of a race of people and leave out the likes of Bob Marley, who the world knows not only talked the talk but gave his whole life's efforts to walk the walk for freedom and unity of people all over the world. And what of Marcus Garvey and Malcolm X?? There are no more than five if not four people who deserve to be on this list. It's a joke!! Personall I do not subscribe to a Black History month anyway - I have and celebrate 365 Black History Days???

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